Floyd & Meadow
A safe-haven for the Untitled.

"Irrelevancy is not an insult. In a vulgar society, it can be a virtue." -Philip Kennicott
Floyd & Meadow
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gifmovie:

Shadow play in Nosferatu (1922)
gifmovie:

Shadow play in Nosferatu (1922)
gifmovie:

Shadow play in Nosferatu (1922)
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thinktankgallery:

INTERVIEW WITH YOU ARE HERE II “BEST IN SHOW” WINNER ROGER CLAY
After a month of many photographers chasing cops through some of the more rough-and-tumble parts of town, no one got in closer than “Best in Show” winner Roger Clay. The artist, who worked exclusively from an iPhone before capturing the Ghetto Gardens shot (above) that won him the Leica D-Lux 6 prize, shot with a certain subtlety that showed through in his proximity to his subjects, and lays out some of this in his interview, below. 
How did you find out about YOU ARE HERE II and what drew you to apply before knowing the subject matter?



I saw the link (one of the curators) Rinzi posted on FaceBook. The challenge of shooting the unknown was something I wanted to try. Street photography is all about the unknown and what comes your way and how you react to it. I think that’s why there were so many good images .






What changed in your approach once we dropped the surprise subject on participants?

The first thing I thought was its not going to be easy getting real close to those guys because they don’t stay in place very long .

For what were you looking in your shots?

As far as just shooting cops it’s real fluid. I went out on three 12-hour shifts with them and when things happened - it happens fast.






Did you ever think about the fact that shooting from an iPhone was one of the factors that inspired the show? Police have a newfound accountability now that every citizen can stream their actions online which has changed cultural policy.

As far as accountability for what they are seen doing, I think it’s always been there but in what ever profession someone decides to do there are always going to be a few that fuck it up for the ones trying to do the right thing .






Can you describe the challenge of getting the Best in Show shot?

I think we all had challenges; a lot of it is just being in the right place at the right time. With all the wonderful images that were shown at the gallery, I was truly honored to have been chosen . After a little over two years of doing street photography this is by far the highlight of my work.

What do you think about winning the Leica D-Lux 6? Will you use it or stick to your cell?

The very next day after receiving the Leica I had the chance to get some good photos of my nieces. I really like the sharpness of the Leica. And I’m convinced it will be out with me on the streets taking photos.

Can you also describe the day or the experience you had in getting the Best in Show shot itself?

The day we went to the pot bust was by far the best experience of trying to document my ride-alongs for the show. So much goes on and the LAPD works fast. They were very professional and were more than excited to let me see what they were doing. We must have been there for at least four hours and these officers were working nonstop. Clearing out a 4-story building is a heavy task. And then after leaving the pot bust not five minutes later there was a felony stop we responded to. Needless to say it was one of the fastest 12 hours I ever had.

You can find roger on Instagram @rogered or on Flickr at Roger B. Clay.
Interview by Jacob Patterson. Shots above: Ghetto Gardens by Roger Clay and portraits of Roger Clay by Dana Barsuhn
thinktankgallery:

INTERVIEW WITH YOU ARE HERE II “BEST IN SHOW” WINNER ROGER CLAY
After a month of many photographers chasing cops through some of the more rough-and-tumble parts of town, no one got in closer than “Best in Show” winner Roger Clay. The artist, who worked exclusively from an iPhone before capturing the Ghetto Gardens shot (above) that won him the Leica D-Lux 6 prize, shot with a certain subtlety that showed through in his proximity to his subjects, and lays out some of this in his interview, below. 
How did you find out about YOU ARE HERE II and what drew you to apply before knowing the subject matter?



I saw the link (one of the curators) Rinzi posted on FaceBook. The challenge of shooting the unknown was something I wanted to try. Street photography is all about the unknown and what comes your way and how you react to it. I think that’s why there were so many good images .






What changed in your approach once we dropped the surprise subject on participants?

The first thing I thought was its not going to be easy getting real close to those guys because they don’t stay in place very long .

For what were you looking in your shots?

As far as just shooting cops it’s real fluid. I went out on three 12-hour shifts with them and when things happened - it happens fast.






Did you ever think about the fact that shooting from an iPhone was one of the factors that inspired the show? Police have a newfound accountability now that every citizen can stream their actions online which has changed cultural policy.

As far as accountability for what they are seen doing, I think it’s always been there but in what ever profession someone decides to do there are always going to be a few that fuck it up for the ones trying to do the right thing .






Can you describe the challenge of getting the Best in Show shot?

I think we all had challenges; a lot of it is just being in the right place at the right time. With all the wonderful images that were shown at the gallery, I was truly honored to have been chosen . After a little over two years of doing street photography this is by far the highlight of my work.

What do you think about winning the Leica D-Lux 6? Will you use it or stick to your cell?

The very next day after receiving the Leica I had the chance to get some good photos of my nieces. I really like the sharpness of the Leica. And I’m convinced it will be out with me on the streets taking photos.

Can you also describe the day or the experience you had in getting the Best in Show shot itself?

The day we went to the pot bust was by far the best experience of trying to document my ride-alongs for the show. So much goes on and the LAPD works fast. They were very professional and were more than excited to let me see what they were doing. We must have been there for at least four hours and these officers were working nonstop. Clearing out a 4-story building is a heavy task. And then after leaving the pot bust not five minutes later there was a felony stop we responded to. Needless to say it was one of the fastest 12 hours I ever had.

You can find roger on Instagram @rogered or on Flickr at Roger B. Clay.
Interview by Jacob Patterson. Shots above: Ghetto Gardens by Roger Clay and portraits of Roger Clay by Dana Barsuhn
thinktankgallery:

INTERVIEW WITH YOU ARE HERE II “BEST IN SHOW” WINNER ROGER CLAY
After a month of many photographers chasing cops through some of the more rough-and-tumble parts of town, no one got in closer than “Best in Show” winner Roger Clay. The artist, who worked exclusively from an iPhone before capturing the Ghetto Gardens shot (above) that won him the Leica D-Lux 6 prize, shot with a certain subtlety that showed through in his proximity to his subjects, and lays out some of this in his interview, below. 
How did you find out about YOU ARE HERE II and what drew you to apply before knowing the subject matter?



I saw the link (one of the curators) Rinzi posted on FaceBook. The challenge of shooting the unknown was something I wanted to try. Street photography is all about the unknown and what comes your way and how you react to it. I think that’s why there were so many good images .






What changed in your approach once we dropped the surprise subject on participants?

The first thing I thought was its not going to be easy getting real close to those guys because they don’t stay in place very long .

For what were you looking in your shots?

As far as just shooting cops it’s real fluid. I went out on three 12-hour shifts with them and when things happened - it happens fast.






Did you ever think about the fact that shooting from an iPhone was one of the factors that inspired the show? Police have a newfound accountability now that every citizen can stream their actions online which has changed cultural policy.

As far as accountability for what they are seen doing, I think it’s always been there but in what ever profession someone decides to do there are always going to be a few that fuck it up for the ones trying to do the right thing .






Can you describe the challenge of getting the Best in Show shot?

I think we all had challenges; a lot of it is just being in the right place at the right time. With all the wonderful images that were shown at the gallery, I was truly honored to have been chosen . After a little over two years of doing street photography this is by far the highlight of my work.

What do you think about winning the Leica D-Lux 6? Will you use it or stick to your cell?

The very next day after receiving the Leica I had the chance to get some good photos of my nieces. I really like the sharpness of the Leica. And I’m convinced it will be out with me on the streets taking photos.

Can you also describe the day or the experience you had in getting the Best in Show shot itself?

The day we went to the pot bust was by far the best experience of trying to document my ride-alongs for the show. So much goes on and the LAPD works fast. They were very professional and were more than excited to let me see what they were doing. We must have been there for at least four hours and these officers were working nonstop. Clearing out a 4-story building is a heavy task. And then after leaving the pot bust not five minutes later there was a felony stop we responded to. Needless to say it was one of the fastest 12 hours I ever had.

You can find roger on Instagram @rogered or on Flickr at Roger B. Clay.
Interview by Jacob Patterson. Shots above: Ghetto Gardens by Roger Clay and portraits of Roger Clay by Dana Barsuhn
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ruivelindro:

Medieval Fair
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Never again, rosemary.
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kerrihacker:

Gary, Indiana is often referred to by Chicagoans as the armpit of America. When you drive through the town, it looks empty. Abandoned buildings and closed businesses line the street. There are no cars on the road and you can go awhile without seeing anyone walking on the street. The town was artificially founded by a steel corporation and has many grand buildings adorning the streets. While the town never had a population over 200,00, after the “white flight” of the 70’s and the 80’s, its population declined over 50%. It is now one of the more dangerous cities in the U.S.

I drove to Gary yesterday with the intention of exploring some of these once majestic buildings and attempting to capture that majesty in its desolation and disrepair. Like a dummy though, I forgot to charge my camera and these were the only shots I got from my 5D. The next post will be my iPhone shots.

Decay
kerrihacker:

Gary, Indiana is often referred to by Chicagoans as the armpit of America. When you drive through the town, it looks empty. Abandoned buildings and closed businesses line the street. There are no cars on the road and you can go awhile without seeing anyone walking on the street. The town was artificially founded by a steel corporation and has many grand buildings adorning the streets. While the town never had a population over 200,00, after the “white flight” of the 70’s and the 80’s, its population declined over 50%. It is now one of the more dangerous cities in the U.S.

I drove to Gary yesterday with the intention of exploring some of these once majestic buildings and attempting to capture that majesty in its desolation and disrepair. Like a dummy though, I forgot to charge my camera and these were the only shots I got from my 5D. The next post will be my iPhone shots.

Decay
kerrihacker:

Gary, Indiana is often referred to by Chicagoans as the armpit of America. When you drive through the town, it looks empty. Abandoned buildings and closed businesses line the street. There are no cars on the road and you can go awhile without seeing anyone walking on the street. The town was artificially founded by a steel corporation and has many grand buildings adorning the streets. While the town never had a population over 200,00, after the “white flight” of the 70’s and the 80’s, its population declined over 50%. It is now one of the more dangerous cities in the U.S.

I drove to Gary yesterday with the intention of exploring some of these once majestic buildings and attempting to capture that majesty in its desolation and disrepair. Like a dummy though, I forgot to charge my camera and these were the only shots I got from my 5D. The next post will be my iPhone shots.

Decay
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Rothko.
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theeventhorizon17:

yessssss 

Shrimp.
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Love.
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bloombergphotos:

A customer walks past an electronic stock board at a security firm in Shanghai, on Feb. 5.
Photograph by Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg